Missionary, Mercenary and Bedouin

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BEDOON 003 WADI RUM 037 BEDOON 004

Jordan Desert

Travel to foreign and exotic places opens my eyes and reminds me of other realities unlike my own.

1/Cold nights in a Bedouin tent, smoking and drinking with the natives.

2/Two Mikes
On the left our bodyguard, whose presence allowed us entry into the most unlikely places, safely. Mike on the right was a minister in a small mid-western town, sent on  a missionary journey by his family and congregation with no return date projected. He had never tasted alcohol and couldn’t wrap his head around two  American women in Jordan, he had to sit when we told him we were bellydancers.

3/No name mercenary. Translated  by our bodyguard about the “arms deal” being made around the camp fire. We gladly shared our alcohol, but kept our charms hidden.

Photos purposely kept raw and untouched…

Note to self, this was almost a year to the day that we had departed from Egypt on the eve of Arab Spring, highlights of news were reports of Mubarak’s trial.

 

So you are Invited to a Wedding.

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I’ve performed in literally hundreds of weddings  with audiences who are Egyptian, Jordanian, Palestinian, Syrian, Persian or Lebanese. There have been some interesting combinations of ethnicitys marrying each other also. An Egyptian marrying outside of their culture to a Samoan. A Jewish Egyptian marrying a Syrian Druze. Needless to say, I know my music and I know how to “do” a wedding!
A musician I’ve worked with (Arab) was getting married and was inviting all of his (older: age and length of acquaintance)  friends as guests and his newer friends to work. So many of the musicians and several other professional dancers I’ve worked with were in the wedding party and not performing. Of course I was excited to attend an evening of great music and dance.  Well, it didn’t turn out as I expected…don’t get me wrong, it was a great party. I’d envisioned a 10 piece orchestra, no, just a 3 piece.  Thankfully they were the most seasoned of the pros there and the rest were in the wedding party and guests. So despite not being a 10 piece orchestra, the music was rocking!

So speaking about the music, the dancers.  The first dancer slayed me, or her choice of music did, literally. She was a lovely dancer…but her music was better suited to drilling in a dance studio than entertaining a discriminating audience. So irritating and inappropriate that it distracted me from any enjoyment of her show.

Enter second dancer, who was also lovely. Her musical choices were dynamic and appropriate for a wedding show. Her musical choice connected every member in the audience to her dance and the cultural traditions in which she was representing.

Some ideas in what not to use in a show for a wedding.

Tarab...enjoying the music as a guest.

Tarab…enjoying the music as a guest.

 Drum drills….anything that repeats for convenience sake, like perfect for the classroom is not what you want to use.
A remix…Even if it’s to a well known song…just don’t.

A 9 minute majenci or opening piece. I love the elaborateness of this format, works great in a nightclub where you have a 40 minute show. When was the last time you saw a 40 minute show? My point, your show is only a very small part of an elaborate evening planned on showcasing the bride and groom.  Save that 9 minute opening for when all eyes are on you and you are a big part of the evening’s entertainment.

Some ideas in what to use..

A short dynamic majenci, yes there are many of them available.  Some are classics or remakes of classics. Using music with multiple rhythms makes your job as a dancer so much easier. Double points if it has a strong beledy or baladi beat, every one can connect to this rhythm, even if they don’t know the name of it.
A classic folkloric song, there are a lot of choices depending on what ethnicity of your audience.  Chances are the parents are involved in the payment of your performance, and if you can connect with the elders in your audience with your musical choice (as well as the women and children)…you’ve got a winning combo.

These are a just a couple of ideas.  Teachers, don’t withhold valuable info from your students, it makes us all look bad in the audience’s eye. Students, if you don’t know, ask.

Peace On the Nile

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Nile January,11,2011Peace on Da Nile

Just days before the revolution, cool, crisp, white bright day in Cairo.

Istanbul 2012, Cold Winter Day

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Istanbul 2012, Cold Winter Day

Though it was crisp (cold)! day…the light and feeling of Istanbul was magic!  Though there is no picture, one of the highlights of a trip to Istanbul, is the ritual of hammam.

Stars of Twelve
Dozen Arches
Whispers of Ancient giggles and gossips echoing in my mind as I steam…
Stripped to skin and bones….
Amidst the bubbles.

See if you can imagine it!